Although Americans are living longer today than ever, that quantity of years can be higher in quality. People who live in the so-called Blue Zones– which researchers have identified as having the highest concentrations of centenarians in the world and include Ikaria, Greece; Okinawa, Japan; Ogliastra Region, Sardinia; Loma Linda, California; and Nicoya Peninsula, Costa Rica – have several “secrets” to their longevity. They move their bodies a lot, they have strong social circles, and they are committed to their families and communities.

The Blue Zone centenarians’ diets often look like this:
• They stop eating when their stomach is 80 percent full to avoid weight gain.
• They eat the smallest meal of the day in the late afternoon or evening.
• They eat mostly plants, especially beans, and eat meat rarely (only a handful of times per month), in small portions.
• They drink alcohol moderately and regularly–approximately 1-2 glasses per day.

The saying goes, “You are what you eat.” So are you ready to make some simple changes to your diet in order to increase your odds of making it to 100? Here are few of the common foods (which are available at American mainstream grocery stores) that were popular among the centenarians in the Blue Zones:
• Legumes (especially chick peas, lentils, and fava beans)
• Eggs
• Goat and sheep milk and cheese
• Almonds
• A variety of fruits and vegetables
• Whole grains like brown rice and oatmeal
• Small amounts of fish or other lean meats
• Herbs and spices like turmeric, fennel, and garlic
• Green tea, soy milk, and red wine

With delicious foods like these, the “Blue Zone diet” is one that just about anyone can follow! Improved nutrition and eating habits can reduce the incidence of preventable, obesity related conditions like heart disease, stroke, type 2 diabetes, and certain types of cancer.

Deerfield’s Health & Wellness Center is an integral part of life in our community. Making fitness a way of life is an attainable goal with our spacious aerobics room, weight room, a café/deli with healthful, delicious food choices, and the Riverwalk Spa. Our state-of-the-art, 20,000 square-foot glass-enclosed Aquatic Center provides beneficial year-round therapy and relaxation.

Here at Deerfield you’ll find your place to thrive, and incorporating some of the Blue Zone residents’ secrets to longevity can contribute to your overall health and well being in body, mind and spirit.

This article was written by Brad Breeding of http://www.mylifesite.net and is legally licensed for use.

Deerfield has just concluded the five year annual site visit for our CARF Accreditation process. The site visit is the culmination of a tremendous amount of deliberate hard work by staff, residents, contract providers, and our Board of Directors to assure that we are meeting the over 1300 standards that are established for high functioning Aging Service Providers. I am pleased to announce that at the exit review on April 25th the survey team cited that they were extremely impressed with our community, services, amenities and great value that we provide to our residents. The end result was that we received no recommendations for needed improvements! This is highly unusual and another confirmation of the dedication and commitment to continue to advance our mission to unprecedented levels. Only about 10% of all communities are CARF accredited and I am proud to be a part of the meaningful work that we do, and thankful for the unselfish commitment of our team.

CARF provides accreditation services worldwide at the request of health and human service providers. Providers that meet their standards have demonstrated their commitment to being among the best available.

Robert F. Wernet, Jr., President & CEO

Brian King, Deerfield Director of Health & Wellness, is very pleased to announce our recent Medicare annual clinical survey resulted in zero deficiencies! “We are incredibly grateful to our staff for their hard work and dedication resulting in our latest Medicare deficiency-free survey. We recognize that our success in this area is incredibly rare for the industry and appreciate the culture that has fostered this degree of recognition from our regulatory agencies. Our residents are, and will continue to be, the object of all our efforts, and in recognizing the success of our labors we are ultimately paying tribute to those under our care.”

Deerfield residents Marilyn and Bill Hubbard are actively involved in the vibrant Asheville community, known for its restaurants, galleries, shops, performance venues, outdoor activities, and breweries. Having lived in the area for nearly 20 years before moving to Deerfield in 2013, the Hubbards decided that volunteering for the Deerfield Relations Committee was the best way they could share their knowledge with new residents to help relieve their anxieties about the city, and enable them to enjoy its offerings. “I want them to be aware of what our local businesses and creative culture has to offer and how to take advantage of the opportunities,” said Bill. “I invite them to join our residents only ‘Local Music Scene’ email list which includes openings and events at music venues, museums and art galleries.” The Hubbards also created what they call “R and D” – Ride and Dine. By sharing rides with their new neighbors, eating together, and then enjoying an event, new residents become better acquainted with one another, as well as find new things to do in the area. “We provide them with a five-page introduction to Asheville that includes some history, maps and a list of our favorite area attractions, including brochures from several of the venues,” said Marilyn. “It’s sort of our version of Welcome Wagon!” The Deerfield community is known for its warm and hospitable atmosphere, and the Hubbards are an integral part of making that happen. They are passionately involved in the local area and eager to share that passion and knowledge with others who have chosen to make Deerfield their home.

You’re Invited!
Saturday, May 5 at 6:00 PM
Blue Ridge Room

Each Thursday and Saturday from 10:00 am to 4:00 pm until April 15, AARP Tax Aide is offering free tax preparation services in the Business Center in Haden Hall near the Riverwalk Café. No appointment is necessary. Phone 828-210-4542.
Please bring the following with you:
• Social Security cards for all who will be listed on the return
• Picture identification
• Last year’s return
• W-2 forms
• All 1099 forms
• Other tax forms including form 1095-etc.
• Detailed lists of receipts for any itemized deductions
• All college expenses and your 1098-T
• Complete brokerage statement
• A blank check for direct deposit or payment information

Deerfield will host a presentation by Julie Goodwin, Outreach Coordinator, Better Business Bureau on March 27th at 4:00 pm in the Blue Ridge Room.

Scams are designed to either steal your money now, or steal your identity now in order to steal your money later. Scammers have all kinds of techniques to collect personal information. Once they have it, they can effectively become you, using your identity to open accounts, file taxes, or obtain medical coverage.

Tips to Spot This Scam:
• Look for unexplained withdrawals, charges, and accounts.
• Check your credit reports regularly for unauthorized inquiries and accounts.

10 Steps to Avoid Scams
1. Never send money to someone you have never met face-to-face.
2. Don’t click on links or open attachments in unsolicited email.
3. Don’t believe everything you see.
4. Don’t buy online unless the transaction is secure.
5. Be extremely cautious when dealing with anyone you’ve met online.
6. Never share personally identifiable information.
7. Don’t be pressured to act immediately.
8. Use secure, traceable transactions when making payments for goods, services, taxes, and debts.
9. Whenever possible, work with local businesses that have proper credentials and check them out at bbb.org to see what other consumers have experienced.
10. Be cautious about what you share on social media.

Deerfield residents can enjoy the beauty of a snowfall without the hassle of having to clear sidewalks and driveways.

One of the main goals at Deerfield for 2018 is CARF reaccreditation. CARF is the Commission on Accreditation of Rehabilitation Facilities, an independent, nonprofit organization focused on advancing the quality of services used in retirement communities. CARF provides accreditation services worldwide at the request of health and human service providers - those providers that meet CARF standards have a demonstrated commitment to being among the best communities. Members of the Deerfield team are working diligently to prepare for the upcoming fourth CARF reaccreditation of the community. During this process of self-study every regulation is carefully scrutinized and assessed. The certification process requires the review and enhancement of dozens of standards, and a site visit every five years from a CARF survey team that consists of senior living professionals from top communities around the country. Of the almost 2,000 communities in the United States, 10% become accredited. This is a voluntary process that Deerfield chooses to commit to knowing that it continually makes us better.

Few of us notice that small changes, often with significant environmental implications, are taking place on the Deerfield Campus.
Here are a few:
• Beginning October 2016, Styrofoam containers for residents to take out food were replaced by compostable ones in the Bistro and Café. Containers are now discarded with garbage rather than recycled; but unlike Styrofoam, they degrade in the landfill without releasing toxic or harmful chemicals.
• The Dining Department continues to prepare and serve locally grown and produced products when available and affordable.
• The Facilities Department has incorporated energy saving projects that reduce both expenses and our carbon footprint. Projects geared towards sustainability this year include replacing: obsolete boilers in skilled nursing; laundry electric boilers with natural gas; skilled nursing HVAC in common area with more efficient units; and replacing windows in East and West wings of skilled nursing. A timer and pump will be added to the Tuton Hall water vault, to allow some pumps to shut down at times of lower demand, saving energy.
• Grounds and Landscaping Department continues to incorporate native plants in our landscaping, as these plants generally require less water and chemical use. They also collect the leaves and compost them for use in the Community Garden and other landscape projects.

Residents also make a difference in energy conservation. The electric rate between peak and non-peak hours is significant.

-The ad hoc Sustainability Committee